Jun 03

The Wartime Spies Who Used Knitting as an Espionage Tool – Atlas Obscura

DURING WORLD WAR I, A grandmother in Belgium knitted at her window, watching the passing trains. As one train chugged by, she made a bumpy stitch in the fabric with her two needles. Another passed, and she dropped a stitch from the fabric, making an intentional hole.

Later, she would risk her life by handing the fabric to a soldier—a fellow spy in the Belgian resistance, working to defeat the occupying German force.Whether women knitted codes into fabric or used stereotypes of knitting women as a cover, there’s a history between knitting and espionage. “Spies have been known to work code messages into knitting, embroidery, hooked rugs, etc,” according to the 1942 book A Guide to Codes and Signals.

During wartime, where there were knitters, there were often spies; a pair of eyes, watching between the click of two needles.

Read more: The Wartime Spies Who Used Knitting as an Espionage Tool – Atlas Obscura

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